All posts by Offroadnortheast

Bump Steer… What is it?

‘Bump steer’ is a term used by road testers, but often misunderstood by some of the people who use it – let alone readers to interpret it. Bump steer describes a steering effect caused by suspension movement as the vehicle passes over undulations.
Bump steer is often confused with axle hop or axle tramp.

The classic bump steer effect is noticed in leaf-sprung 4WDs, because a leaf spring is longer when flat than it is when positively or negatively curved. The lengthening and shortening takes place all the time there is suspension movement and that fore and aft movement causes the axles to change their ideal right angle position across the chassis.

If you look at a leaf-sprung 4WD from the side as it moves over a hump, you can see the slight rearward movement of the axles. The more the suspension deflects, the greater the angling effect of the axles and the more self-steering effect on the vehicle.

When bump steer is more noticeable in leaf-sprung vehicle, you can have bump steering effect with coil-sprung axles, because their pivot on control arms which move through arcs, which can impart some steering effect.

Bump steer is often noticed at the front of 4WDs that have a ‘live’ front axle, rather than independent, wishbone suspension. Because the two front wheel are linked by a tubular axle beam and a steering tie rod, when one wheel encounters a bump, the reaction is fed to the other wheel.

Bump steer, axle hop and axle tramp can be experienced virtually any 4WD if you push hard enough on rough roads, so it’s important to know your vehicle’s degree of axle control. Driving technique – minimizing savage acceleration and braking – can reduce axle misbehavior.

Another value technique is to find the ‘sweet spot’ when running on corrugated roads – that speed which provides the best ride and good directional control.

In Memory Of G-Man

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After a long fight with cancer Gman passed away this morning.

One of the offroading family that will be missed by all!

Graeme Smith
13/3/1984 – 19/01/2011

Parents pay tribute to tragic Boosbeck man

TRIBUTES are pouring in for young Teesside bone cancer victim Graeme Smith, who has lost a brave battle against the disease.

TRIBUTES are pouring in for young Teesside bone cancer victim Graeme Smith, who has lost a brave battle against the disease.

Graeme, 26, of Margrove Road, Boosbeck, near Guisborough, died in Teesside Hospice on January 19.

His heartbroken parents Donald and Elizabeth Smith told the Gazette he was a “real outdoor type”.

Graeme had already beaten aplastic anaemia as a six-year-old by having a donor bone marrow transplant at Newcastle RVI.

Dad Donald, 64, said Graeme – who loved off-road trials motorbiking and driving his Land Rover off-road – began to complain of backache last July.

After seeing his doctor, he was referred to Middlesbrough’s James Cook University Hospital for a scan, which showed a significant mass in his pelvic area.

Donald said: “Later, he was diagnosed with cancer and it was very aggressive, but he fought it very bravely.”

Mum Elizabeth, 52, said: “He was a real fighter and fought it right to the end.”

Graeme, who was single, had many friends in the East Cleveland area and also on Teesside.

He was a member of Guisborough Motor Club and the NE 4X4 Club.

He was born in Middlesbrough in 1984, but had lived in Boosbeck all his life.

Recently, he had been a bathroom and kitchen fitter’s mate, working for Welham’s of Marske.

But he had also worked at Gisborough Hall as a bar worker for some time previously.

Dad Donald said: “He had met a lot of people in his work and was well liked.”

Graeme attended Lockwood Primary School, the former Warsett Comprehensive School at Brotton and then Cleveland Technical College, where he studied electrical engineering.

Afterwards, he studied the same subject at Teesside University at a higher level.

Mum Elizabeth said: “He was very hard working and always gave of his best.

“He would do anything for anyone and had lots of friends.

“He still had to visit Newcastle RVI for periodic tests on his bone marrow transplant. As a child he had to have full body radiotherapy before having his transplant.

“It’s possible that his earlier disease may have had a link with his cancer, but doctors aren’t sure.

“He will be very sadly missed by all the family, local people and his friends.”

As well as his parents, Graeme leaves an older sister Rachel, 29, brother-in-law Michael and other close relatives, including his niece Beth, 10, and nephew Evan, three.

His funeral was at 11.30am 28th January 2011 at Boosbeck’s St Aidan’s Church, followed by burial in the local cemetery.

His funeral was at 11.30am 28th January 2011 at Boosbeck’s St Aidan’s Church, followed by burial in the local cemetery.